Web Design

We design websites that lead to more BRAND recognition, TRUST, leads, instant CREDIBILITY and increased SALES. 

We provide value and a return on your investment by designing websites that are attractive, professional and user friendly. Every page, link, click and action on the website is to help facilitate growth of your business and sales.

Design Types

Static

A static website contains Web pages with fixed content.

Read more

Dynamic

A Dynamic website contains Web pages generated in real time.

Read more

eCommerce

An eCommerce website is an online platform used to sell your goods.

Read more

Mobile Apps

Mobile Apps are a new trend that compliments your site.

Read more

Choosing a design

There are various design types to choose from some may be viable for your organisation and some may not. The cheapest option would be a static website, which is basically a fixed site whereby the design work and content is final. A Dynamic or CMS website will allow you to make changes on a regular basis to the content. An eCommerce website is most suitable for business that would like to sell their goods online. Mobile Apps are a new tend in the market and should be an extension of your site. At Fotografiks we are not limited to these types. We also design ticket systems, social websites, catalogues and much more. Consider the following...

    • Who is your target market?
    • What is your budget?
    • Are you selling goods?
    • Do you need a social footprint?
    • Do you have an established brand?
    • Do you want local, national or global exposure?
    • Do you currently have a website?

Web Traffic Stats 2018

Per Device
    • Laptops & PCs
      45%
    • Mobile Phones 
      50%
    • Tablet Devices 
      5%
    • Other Devices
      0.12%

Static Websites

A static website contains Web pages with fixed content. Each page is coded in HTML and displays the same information to every visitor. Static sites are the most basic type of website and are the easiest to create. Unlike dynamic websites, they do not require any Web programming or database design. A static site can be built by simply creating a few HTML pages and publishing them to a Web server.

Since static Web pages contain fixed code, the content of each page does not change unless it is manually updated by the webmaster. This works well for small websites, but it can make large sites with hundreds or thousands of pages difficult to maintain. Therefore, larger websites typically use dynamic pages, which can be updated by simply modifying a database record. Static sites that contain a lot of pages are often designed using templates. This makes it possible to update several pages at once, and also helps provide a consistent layout throughout the site.

Static web pages are often HTML documents stored as files in the file system and made available by the web server over HTTP (nevertheless URLs ending with ".html" are not always static). However, loose interpretations of the term could include web pages stored in a database, and could even include pages formatted using a template and served through an application server, as long as the page served is unchanging and presented essentially as stored.

Static web pages are suitable for the contents that never or rarely need to be updated, though modern static site generators are changing. Maintaining large numbers of static pages as files can be impractical without automated tools, such as Static site generators described in Web template system. Any personalization or interactivity has to run client-side, which is restricting.

Advantages of a static website
  • Provide improved security over dynamic websites[1]
  • Improved performance for end users compared to dynamic websites[2]
  • Fewer or no dependencies on systems such as databases or other application servers
Disadvantages of a static website
  • Dynamic functionality has to be added separately

Dynamic Websites

A dynamic website is one that changes or customizes itself frequently and automatically. Server-side dynamic pages are generated "on the fly" by computer code that produces the HTML (CSS are responsible for appearance and thus, are static files). There are a wide range of software systems, such as CGI, Java Servlets and Java Server Pages (JSP), Active Server Pages and ColdFusion (CFML) that are available to generate dynamic web systems and dynamic sites. Various web application frameworks and web template systems are available for general-use programming languages like Perl, PHP, Python and Ruby to make it faster and easier to create complex dynamic websites.

A site can display the current state of a dialogue between users, monitor a changing situation, or provide information in some way personalized to the requirements of the individual user. For example, when the front page of a news site is requested, the code running on the web server might combine stored HTML fragments with news stories retrieved from a database or another website via RSS to produce a page that includes the latest information. Dynamic sites can be interactive by using HTML forms, storing and reading back browser cookies, or by creating a series of pages that reflect the previous history of clicks. Another example of dynamic content is when a retail website with a database of media products allows a user to input a search request, e.g. for the keyword Beatles. In response, the content of the web page will spontaneously change the way it looked before, and will then display a list of Beatles products like CDs, DVDs and books. Dynamic HTML uses JavaScript code to instruct the web browser how to interactively modify the page contents. One way to simulate a certain type of dynamic website while avoiding the performance loss of initiating the dynamic engine on a per-user or per-connection basis, is to periodically automatically regenerate a large series of static pages.

eCommerce Websites

E-commerce is the activity of buying or selling of products on online services or over the Internet. Electronic commerce draws on technologies such as mobile commerce, electronic funds transfer, supply chain management, Internet marketing, online transaction processing, electronic data interchange (EDI), inventory management systems, and automated data collection systems.

Modern electronic commerce typically uses the World Wide Web for at least one part of the transaction's life cycle although it may also use other technologies such as e-mail. Typical e-commerce transactions include the purchase of online books (such as Amazon) and music purchases (music download in the form of digital distribution such as iTunes Store), and to a less extent, customized/personalized online liquor store inventory services.[1] There are three areas of e-commerce: online retailing, electric markets, and online auctions. E-commerce is supported by electronic business.[2]


E-commerce businesses may also employ some or all of the followings:

  • Online shopping for retail sales direct to consumers via Web sites and mobile apps, and conversational commerce via live chat, chatbots, and voice assistants[3]
  • Providing or participating in online marketplaces, which process third-party business-to-consumer or consumer-to-consumer sales
  • Business-to-business buying and selling;
  • Gathering and using demographic data through web contacts and social media
  • Business-to-business (B2B) electronic data interchange
  • Marketing to prospective and established customers by e-mail or fax (for example, with newsletters)
  • Engaging in pretail for launching new products and services
  • Online financial exchanges for currency exchanges or trading purposes.

Mobile Applications

Most mobile devices are sold with several apps bundled as pre-installed software, such as a web browser, email client, calendar, mapping program, and an app for buying music, other media, or more apps. Some pre-installed apps can be removed by an ordinary uninstall process, thus leaving more storage space for desired ones. Where the software does not allow this, some devices can be rooted to eliminate the undesired apps.

Apps that are not preinstalled are usually available through distribution platforms called app stores. They began appearing in 2008 and are typically operated by the owner of the mobile operating system, such as the Apple App Store, Google Play, Windows Phone Store, and BlackBerry App World. However, there are independent app stores, such as Cydia, GetJar and F-Droid. Some apps are free, while others must be bought. Usually, they are downloaded from the platform to a target device, but sometimes they can be downloaded to laptops or desktop computers. For apps with a price, generally a percentage, 20-30%, goes to the distribution provider (such as iTunes), and the rest goes to the producer of the app.[3] The same app can, therefore, cost a different price depending on the mobile platform.

Apps can also be installed manually, for example by running an Android application package on Android devices.

The official US Army iPhone app presents the service's technology news, updates and media in a single place

Mobile apps were originally offered for general productivity and information retrieval, including email, calendar, contacts, the stock market and weather information. However, public demand and the availability of developer tools drove rapid expansion into other categories, such as those handled by desktop application software packages. As with other software, the explosion in number and variety of apps made discovery a challenge, which in turn led to the creation of a wide range of review, recommendation, and curation sources, including blogs, magazines, and dedicated online app-discovery services. In 2014 government regulatory agencies began trying to regulate and curate apps, particularly medical apps.[4] Some companies offer apps as an alternative method to deliver content with certain advantages over an official website.

Usage of mobile apps has become increasingly prevalent across mobile phone users.[5] A May 2012 comScore study reported that during the previous quarter, more mobile subscribers used apps than browsed the web on their devices: 51.1% vs. 49.8% respectively.[6] Researchers found that usage of mobile apps strongly correlates with user context and depends on user's location and time of the day.[7] Mobile apps are playing an ever-increasing role within healthcare and when designed and integrated correctly can yield many benefits.[8][9]

Feel free to fill in these application forms online or download the PDF versions.